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    Right Ventricular Dysfunction

    Right Ventricular Dysfunction

    Heart failure happens when your heart has trouble pumping the right amount of blood through the body. This means the body will not receive the oxygen it needs to work well. When the heart is not working well, blood can back up into the lungs, neck, belly, and arms. It can also cause swelling in the legs or other parts of the body. Heart failure is a long-term problem and will get worse over time. Your doctor will work hard to treat your heart failure and to keep you as healthy as possible.

    Name

    Heart Failure, Adult

    About this topic

    Heart failure happens when your heart has trouble pumping the right amount of blood through the body. This means the body will not receive the oxygen it needs to work well. When the heart is not working well, blood can back up into the lungs, neck, belly, and arms. It can also cause swelling in the legs or other parts of the body. Heart failure is a long-term problem and will get worse over time. Your doctor will work hard to treat your heart failure and to keep you as healthy as possible.

    What drugs may be needed?

    Help relax blood vessels. This makes it easier for the heart to work and may also lower your blood pressure. These are ACE inhibitors and ARBs.,Slow down the heart rate so that it doesn't have to work as hard. These are beta blockers.,Help the heart beat stronger and better,Get rid of extra salt and water in the body. These are water pills or diuretics.

    What changes to diet are needed?

    Ask your doctor or dietician what kind of diet is best for you. The doctor may tell you to limit your salt and fat or how much fluid you drink.,The DASH diet may be helpful. The DASH diet helps to lower blood pressure. This diet includes lots of fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy foods, and foods that are low in saturated fat, total fat, and cholesterol. Using the DASH diet with a low salt diet may lower blood pressure even more.,Learn to read labels to see how much salt or sodium is in foods. Lowering your salt intake will help you control some of your symptoms.

    When do I need to call the doctor?

    Signs of heart attack: Chest pain Trouble breathing Fast heartbeat Feeling dizzy,Chest pain,Trouble breathing,Fast heartbeat,Feeling dizzy,Problems with breathing. These include an increase in shortness of breath, wheezing, needing to sleep while sitting up to breathe, using more pillows at night, or other breathing troubles.,Problems with swelling and weight gain. These include gaining more than 2 to 3 pounds (0.9 to 1.35 kg) in a day or 5 pounds (2.25 kg) in a week; more swelling in your feet, ankles or legs; passing more or less urine than normal; or passing dark urine. You may notice that your shoes are tighter or you have rings around your ankles or knees where your socks end. You may also notice swelling in your belly.,Feelings of being very tired or weak,Pain in your arm(s), neck, jaw, belly, or back,Cough that does not go away or coughing up pink or white foamy mucus,A pounding heart that is racing very fast or skipping beats or does not otherwise feel normal,You are not feeling better in 2 to 3 days or you are feeling worse

    Body systems

    Adult,Cardiovascular,Emergency Medicine

    What are other common names?

    CHF,Chronic Cardiac Failure,Chronic Heart Failure,Chronic Myocardial Failure,Congestive Heart Failure,Cor Pulmonale,Diastolic Heart Failure,Heart Failure in Adults,Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction,Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction,HF,High-Output Heart Failure,Left Ventricular Dysfunction,Left Ventricular Failure,Left-Sided Heart Failure,Low-Output Heart Failure,Right-Sided Heart Failure,Systolic Heart Failure

    Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer

    This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from your health care provider. This is only a brief summary of general information. It does NOT include all information about conditions, illnesses, injuries, tests, procedures, treatments, therapies, discharge instructions or life-style choices that may apply to you. You must talk with your health care provider for complete information about your health and treatment options. This information should not be used to decide whether or not to accept your health care provider’s advice, instructions or recommendations. Only your health care provider has the knowledge and training to provide advice that is right for you.

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