Intermittent Explosive Disorder

Intermittent Explosive Disorder

Tantrums are natural behaviors in young children because of their developmental age. Young children may show frustration by kicking and screaming while lying on the floor. Other factors can also cause your child to have tantrums. These include: Hunger or tiredness − Your child may be very tired and hungry after a long day of playing or school. This can be overwhelming for a child. Frustration − Sometimes, children are not be able to say what they want using words. If the adult does not understand, the child may become very frustrated. Wanting attention − Your child may feel a tantrum is the only way to get your attention. Being told no − Children may react with a tantrum when they are told no to something they want or like to do. Wants independence − Children want to do things for themselves. A tantrum may happen if you have to help or hold your child to keep them safe. During tantrums, your child is out of control. It is important that you stay in control of the situation. How you handle yourself during your child's tantrum is very important. Here are ways to help when your child is having a tantrum: Stay calm. Do not shout at or punish your child. If the tantrum makes you tense, leave the room if your child will remain safe without you there. Wait a minute or 2 and calm yourself. Then, go back to your child. Put your child in a safe place like a crib or room where you can supervise your child but your child can cry freely. Move your child away from the problem and give your child time to calm down. Give your child a short break. Some parents use a time out. A good rule of thumb is 1 minute for each year of age. For example, your 3-year old may get a 3-minute time out. If you cannot leave your child alone, stay in the room, watch your child for safety, but do not give your child attention during the tantrum. Do not make eye contact with your child. After the time out or when your child has calmed down, talk with your child. Use simple words about what your child did. This will help teach your child that a tantrum is not a way to get needs met. Listen to your child. Then, your child will learn that using words will let others know what your child is thinking. Make sure that your child understands that the tantrums need to stop. Give praise when your child can use words to talk about feelings. Remember, shouting and punishing your child during a tantrum may cause more problems. You should not give in to your child's demands to stop the tantrums. If you do, your child will learn that tantrums will help get what your child wants in the future.

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