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Dupuytren's Contracture

Dupuytren's Contracture

What is Dupuytren's contracture? — Dupuytren's contracture is a condition that affects 1 or both hands. It causes the tissue under the skin on the palm to thicken. Over time, this can affect the finger muscles and how the fingers move.
Dupuytren's contracture usually gets worse slowly over many years. Most often, it involves the ring finger and little finger.
What are the symptoms of Dupuytren's contracture? — Early on, the tissue under the skin on the palm of the hand becomes thick. This is usually painless.
Later on, people can have other symptoms that include:
Hard bumps (called "nodules") under the skin on the palm
Bands of thick tissue under the skin on the palm
Finger joint stiffness
Trouble straightening 1 or more fingers all the way (usually the ring and little fingers)
Some people have mild symptoms and can use their hand without difficulty. Other people have severe symptoms and have trouble using their hand for everyday activities and tasks.
Is there a test for Dupuytren's contracture? — No. There is no test. But your doctor or nurse should be able to tell if you have it by learning about your symptoms and doing an exam.
How is Dupuytren's contracture treated? — Dupuytren's contracture is treated in different ways, depending on how severe the symptoms are. Treatment can't stop the condition from getting worse, but it can help reduce symptoms.
If your symptoms are mild, there are some things you can do to help keep them from getting worse. You can cushion tool handles and other items you need to grip by putting tape on them. You can also use padded gloves when you grab or hold heavy objects.
If your symptoms are severe, your doctor will talk with you about treatments to help your fingers move and straighten. All of the treatments involve removing or breaking apart the thick tissue (or bands of tissue) under the skin.
The different treatments include:
Surgery – A doctor can do surgery to remove or break apart the thick tissue.
A procedure – A doctor can stick a needle in your palm to break apart the thick tissue.
Medicine – You can get a shot of medicine in your palm. The medicine softens and breaks up the thick tissue.
Radiation – You can get high doses of X-rays beamed into your hand.
To decide which treatment is right for you, talk with your doctor about the benefits and downsides of each option.
All topics are updated as new evidence becomes available and our peer review process is complete.
This topic retrieved from UpToDate on: Mar 30, 2020.
Topic 16651 Version 7.0
Release: 28.2.2 - C28.105
© 2020 UpToDate, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

Name

Dupuytren's Contracture

Body systems

Emergency Medicine,Neuromuscular and Skeletal,Therapy (Occupational, Physical, Speech, etc)

The Basics

Written by the doctors and editors at UpToDate
What is Dupuytren's contracture? — Dupuytren's contracture is a condition that affects 1 or both hands. It causes the tissue under the skin on the palm to thicken. Over time, this can affect the finger muscles and how the fingers move.
Dupuytren's contracture usually gets worse slowly over many years. Most often, it involves the ring finger and little finger.
What are the symptoms of Dupuytren's contracture? — Early on, the tissue under the skin on the palm of the hand becomes thick. This is usually painless.
Later on, people can have other symptoms that include:
Hard bumps (called "nodules") under the skin on the palm
Bands of thick tissue under the skin on the palm
Finger joint stiffness
Trouble straightening 1 or more fingers all the way (usually the ring and little fingers)
Some people have mild symptoms and can use their hand without difficulty. Other people have severe symptoms and have trouble using their hand for everyday activities and tasks.
Is there a test for Dupuytren's contracture? — No. There is no test. But your doctor or nurse should be able to tell if you have it by learning about your symptoms and doing an exam.
How is Dupuytren's contracture treated? — Dupuytren's contracture is treated in different ways, depending on how severe the symptoms are. Treatment can't stop the condition from getting worse, but it can help reduce symptoms.
If your symptoms are mild, there are some things you can do to help keep them from getting worse. You can cushion tool handles and other items you need to grip by putting tape on them. You can also use padded gloves when you grab or hold heavy objects.
If your symptoms are severe, your doctor will talk with you about treatments to help your fingers move and straighten. All of the treatments involve removing or breaking apart the thick tissue (or bands of tissue) under the skin.
The different treatments include:
Surgery – A doctor can do surgery to remove or break apart the thick tissue.
A procedure – A doctor can stick a needle in your palm to break apart the thick tissue.
Medicine – You can get a shot of medicine in your palm. The medicine softens and breaks up the thick tissue.
Radiation – You can get high doses of X-rays beamed into your hand.
To decide which treatment is right for you, talk with your doctor about the benefits and downsides of each option.
All topics are updated as new evidence becomes available and our peer review process is complete.
This topic retrieved from UpToDate on: Mar 30, 2020.
Topic 16651 Version 7.0
Release: 28.2.2 - C28.105
© 2020 UpToDate, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

What are other common names?

Contracture of Fingers,Contracture of Hands,Contracture of Plamar Fascia,Contractures,Dupuytren Contracture,Familial Palmar Fibromatosis,Familial Plantar Fibromatosis,Finger Contracture Disorders,Hand Surgery,Palmar Fibromas,Palmar Fibromatosis,Plantar Fascial Fibromatosis,Plantar Fibromas

Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer

This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from your health care provider. This is only a brief summary of general information. It does NOT include all information about conditions, illnesses, injuries, tests, procedures, treatments, therapies, discharge instructions or life-style choices that may apply to you. You must talk with your health care provider for complete information about your health and treatment options. This information should not be used to decide whether or not to accept your health care provider's advice, instructions or recommendations. Only your health care provider has the knowledge and training to provide advice that is right for you.The use of UpToDate content is governed by the UpToDate Terms of Use. ©2020 UpToDate, Inc. All rights reserved.

Copyright

© 2020 UpToDate, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

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